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Delhi Air Hostess Had Been Drinking Before Alleged Suicide: Report

New Delhi: 

Months after air hostess Anissia Batra allegedly jumped off the terrace of her South Delhi home, recent medical reports indicate that the 32-year-old was under the influence of alcohol when she died, according to news agency ANI.

Anissia Batra, who worked with Lufthansa Airlines, had been physically and mentally tortured by her husband Mayank Singhvi for dowry, her family had alleged. Days after her death on July 16, WhatsApp messages and emails reveled several details of the “torture” she underwent. 

While the investigation into the case continues, news agency ANI reported that a report by the Regional Forensic Science Laboratory confirmed 298mg/100ml alcohol in Ms Batra’s blood sample adding that the report will make no difference to the investigation by the Crime Branch. 

The Batra family had alleged that Ms Batra’s husband, Mayank Singhvi, who was arrested three days after  her death, was an alcoholic and often beat her up. He also demanded money. The couple were married for over a year.

Earlier this month, The Delhi court had once again rejected the bail plea of the air hostess’ in-laws. 

Ms Batra’s brother Karan Batra had said that she had sent a series of messages to them before she died.

“My sister messaged us to call the police. She said Mayank had locked her in a room. ‘…because of him my life is going to go, please don’t leave him,’ she wrote. We don’t know if he pushed her or she jumped, but we have been trying to get them arrested and police aren’t helping,” he had said.

Ms Batra’s father, a retired Major General, had also filed a complaint a month before the air hostess’ death alleging that his daughter was tortured by her husband and in-laws.

For more Delhi news, click here.

(With inputs from ANI)

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